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The term “groundcover” has been used in the landscaping and construction industries for generations, but has focused primarily on vegetation (think sedum and Creeping Jenny).

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Hemp - A Nutrient-Packed Powerhouse for Mulching

December 1, 2015 11:28:26 PM PST

Most professionals and consumers agree that organic mulch should be considered first over inorganic mulch.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Benefits of Hemp for Mulch

December 1, 2015 11:22:31 PM PST

There are a number of mulching products on the market today. What makes Woven Earth’s hemp mulch matting different? Let’s take a look at a few of the areas where hemp mulch stands apart.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Benefits of Mulch Mats

December 1, 2015 4:14:04 AM PST

What is all this talk about mulch mats?

In addition to different materials, mulch can take many different forms. Shredded bark, bark nuggets, rubber, coco, and plastic sheets are just a few forms you may be familiar with.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Drought Strategies in the Garden

May 21, 2015 10:17:47 AM PDT

Use these strategies to strike the balance between a beautiful garden and conserving water

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Spring is the Time to Mulch

April 1, 2015 11:59:03 AM PDT

Spring is the right time to use organic mulch in your landscaping.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Caring for Trees in Drought

December 4, 2014 10:23:58 PM PST

  Here in California, the drought is on everyone's minds.  The Sonoma County Gazette has published some good advice I'm happy to pass on.  Excerpts:

  Trees and lawn require different watering and should always be set up on separate lines, because lawns need frequent shallow watering, and most trees need infrequent deep watering. Water the tree where the roots are growing: at the drip line and beyond.

  To determine how dry the soil is, use a soil probe or dig down 6 to 18 inches. If the soil is dry - you will know for sure that your tree needs added water. 

  When actively growing in early spring after an adequate winter rainfall, trees don’t need much water, because they draw on soil water stored from the winter. In late summer high-water trees need twice a month deep watering at a minimum. Be attentive to the appearance of your trees. When leaves and branches droop, they reflect inadequate water. 

Native, Drought-Tolerant

  Native, drought-tolerant trees, such as coast live oak or black oak, have evolved with adaptations to survive dry summer conditions of four to five months. This assumes that winter rains have recharged deep water sources. If established, such trees do well June through September with no added water. Starting October if there is no rain it is good to water deeply once a month around the drip line or beyond. 

Replacing With A Drought-Tolerant Tree

  If you have removed your lawn and your thirsty tree has died, but you want some shade, plant a drought tolerant tree like African sumac, acacia or California native oaks.

  The best time to plant is in the fall, so that the roots can become established during a rainy season and while the days are shorter. The next year you will need to water the tree every few weeks during the dry period, by watering around the drip line. But be careful not to overwater. When it is hot and the roots have too much water, fungus can grow in the soil and kill your tree. Plan to organize your garden so that drought tolerant plants are in the same area for ease of watering.

  Proper planting is important! Prepare the soil twice the width of the root ball. Be sure to pull apart the roots; do not plant a root-bound tree. And plant high; the soil will settle. You may want to have a Certified Arborist supervise your landscape crew. If your tree is not planted properly, in a few years it will need to be replaced.

Fruit Trees

  Fruit trees are a special case. You can find excellent information from UC Davis prepared for stone fruit commercial orchards (peaches, plums, nectarines):  “... certain stages of growth are less sensitive to drought stress.”  They recommend reducing watering after harvest. They also offer information on fruit trees’ survival with little or no irrigation water by using a severe pruning technique.  [ucmanagedrought.ucdavis.edu/Agriculture/Crop_Irrigation_Strategies]

Mulch

  All trees will benefit from a deep layer of organic mulch. Be careful not to pile it against the trunks of the trees. Mulch will retain soil moisture, and break down over time to improve the soil with nutrients and organic matter.

Trees And Ivy

  Some beautiful trees are surrounded by a green carpet of ivy. Ivy will steal water and nutrients that are intended for your trees. Some ivy even settles its feet into the tree bark and draws out essential liquids from it. Ivy is a treacherous companion for trees, with or without the drought.

Freewater

  In this time of increased awareness of earth’s environment and limited resources - from reducing plastic waste to driving less and reducing carbon dioxide - we can also rescue our gardens and fruit trees by using freewater: previously invisible water wasted, such as catchment of roof runoff, shower water before it gets hot, and vegetable washing water. Your buckets of reclaimed water might save your tree! 

Copyright 2014 by Ellen Solomon

Blog posters comments: Woven Earth's mulch mats are a great organic solution to mulching around trees.  The natural hemp fiber has fantastic water uptake (the most of any natural fiber), and because of this the mats provide excellent water conservation.  And no need to worry about how close to the tree trunk you place the mats--they will not rot the trunk like traditional bark mulch.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Control Nutsedge With Organic Methods

November 20, 2014 3:01:44 PM PST

Use these tips to control Nutsedge the natural way

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Pre- and Post-Frost Gardening Tasks

November 5, 2014 4:09:09 PM PST

Use these tips for preparing your garden, and enjoying it longer, as the days grow shorter and colder.

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

Fall Mulching Tips

October 14, 2014 9:15:37 PM PDT

  Fall brings the crisp air, the beautiful foliage, and one last hurrah for the garden's aesthetic bounty.  Here are some tips for mulching the garden in the fall.

  If you don't have lots of leaves to use as mulch, or if mixing leaves and bark mulch to keep your mulch from blowing in the wind, please be on the lookout for Woven Earth's newest product in the coming weeks--a mulch mat! (shameless, I know!)

  If you are interested in learning more about our unique, user-friendly, and cost-effective mulch mat, please call us or write us at info@woven-earth.com.

  OK, commercial over...

  

While some homeowners may see working with fall leaves as an odious chore, a garden enthusiast sees rich organic matter being delivered for free to his or her lawn and garden. All it takes is a few passes with a lawnmower to reduce a big volume to a manageable organic resource.

Leaf mulch is high in nutrient content and an extremely useful component in building rich organic matter in lawns and vegetable or flower beds. Just rake leaf mulch into garden beds and spread it evenly.

Although leaf mulch is a natural nitrogen resource, it needs to interact with a carbon source to help it compost into a rich garden humus. Leaf mulch is also highly mobile in fall and winter winds; so, adding a layer of shredded wood mulch will hold it in place nicely.

Shredded wood mulch is the perfect carbon source to interact with leaf mulch. It also keeps the leaf mulch from blowing away and retains moisture to promote composting while insulating the ground to reduce freezing.

When spring rolls around, your leaf and wood mulch will be sufficiently decomposed to work into soils and provide that extra kick to start spring planting off right.

Three helpful tips for fall mulching:

Grind fall leaves with a mower to reduce particle size and improve decomposition.

Cover leaves with shredded wood mulch to retain moisture and promote decomposition. Decom-posed leaves and mulch add valuable organic humus to garden beds.

As cold weather approaches, protect plant roots and bases with a blanket of shredded wood mulch to insulate them from ice and wind chill.

  Taken from http://www.heraldextra.com/sanpete-county/tips-on-fall-mulching/article_93c62168-91e7-5aa4-85b1-0fe644d71944.html

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0 Comments | Posted in Gardening and Landscape By Chris Scruton

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    On behalf of the USDA's BioPreferredĀ® program, the test results for your product indicate a biobased content of 100%.

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    Kate Lewis, Deputy Manager, USDA BioPreferred Program
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